Posts Tagged ‘ Eucharist ’

Please Stop Reinventing The Wheel: An Invitation To Peter Leithart

Nov 9th, 2014 | By | Category: Blog Posts

The contributors here at Called To Communion have previously replied to Peter Leithart. His recent “Staying Put” essentially repeats everything he said in “Too catholic to be Catholic,” so I shall not belabor the points made in our response to that post.1 See also “Peter Leithart’s “The Tragedy of Conversion” to Catholicism or Orthodoxy.” [↩]



Exposing the Blind Side: A Reverted Catholic Looks Back

Jan 1st, 2014 | By | Category: Blog Posts

Gustavo Martin-Asensio was born and raised in Madrid, Spain, in a traditional Catholic family of four. He discovered Evangelicalism while a high school exchange student in West Virginia, and immediately became an avid student of the Bible. Gustavo pursued wholeheartedly the study of the Scriptures, obtaining a masters degree (MCS) in biblical languages from Regent […]



Book Review: Divine Love Made Flesh by Raymond Leo Cardinal Burke

Jun 15th, 2012 | By | Category: Blog Posts

Raymond Leo Cardinal Burke began his episcopacy as bishop of La Crosse, Wisconsin, in 1995. As part of his leadership of his flock, then Bishop Burke consecrated his diocese to the Sacred Heart of Jesus. In 2003 he was then named Archbishop of St. Louis, Missouri. Like he had done in his pastoral leadership of […]



“Too catholic to be Catholic?” A Response to Peter Leithart

May 24th, 2012 | By | Category: Blog Posts

Dr. Peter J. Leithart, fellow at New St. Andrews College and pastor of Trinity Reformed Church in Moscow, Idaho, recently posted an article at his blog that has caught the attention of many who participate in the ongoing Protestant-Catholic dialog. Last year Leithart faced disciplinary charges before the PCA for his Federal Vision theology, though […]



Immortal Diamond: The Search of Gerard Manley Hopkins for Beauty

May 3rd, 2012 | By | Category: Blog Posts

This is a guest post by Michael Rennier. Michael received a BA in New Testament Literature from Oral Roberts University in 2002 and a Master of Divinity from Yale Divinity School in 2006. He served the Anglican Church in North America as the Rector of two parishes on Cape Cod, Massachusetts for five years. After […]



Becoming Catholic in My Heart (Part 1 of Becoming Catholic)

Jan 19th, 2012 | By | Category: Blog Posts

This week is the week for Christian unity. I hope to daily write a brief post about key moments in my journey that pushed me over the edge. I’ll begin by admitting that becoming Catholic is very difficult. For some, it entails for losing their jobs. It can cause deep marital strain and stress. Grown […]



Feast of St. Thomas Aquinas: the Mystery of God and the Mystery of the Eucharist

Jan 28th, 2011 | By | Category: Blog Posts

Today, January 28th, is the feast day of one of the Church’s greatest theologians, Thomas Aquinas (c.1224-1274). For his penetrating syntheses of faith and reason, nature and grace, and speculative, practical and spiritual theology, he is known as the doctor communis, the Common Doctor among the bright and God-consumed minds of the Catholic tradition.



The Church Fathers on Transubstantiation

Dec 13th, 2010 | By | Category: Featured Articles

This article is intended to be a resource showing the support for the doctrine of Transubstantiation in the Church fathers, and not a robust defense of the doctrine as defined by the Council of Trent.1 The Church fathers did not believe in a mere spiritual presence of Christ alongside or in the elements (bread and […]



I Believe in the Rapture-and it Happens Very Often

Aug 31st, 2010 | By | Category: Blog Posts

Becoming Reformed after a six year sojourn in the evangelical world of Calvary Chapel, I was pleased to give up speculations about the end of the world via the notion of an imminent Rapture. There was a lack of historical support for thinking this way, and there was also a pleasing emphasis on Scripture as […]



Christian Worship in the First Century

Jun 17th, 2010 | By | Category: Blog Posts

If you could travel in time and attend a Christian worship service in the first century, what would it be like? Would a Presbyterian feel at home? How about a Catholic? The following is a re-recording of a lecture I gave to a group in Charlotte, NC last year on the subject of “liturgy in […]